Preventing Sin

       Benjamin Franklin is credited with the maxim “An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure.”  Is this not the reasoning behind many people who preemptively get vaccines for polio, influenza, typhoid, malaria, pneumonia, and a host of other possible diseases? …

Understanding My Errors

         Human frailty and fallenness manifests itself in a variety of ways.  There are sins of weakness, sins of folly, sins committed because of ignorance.  There are occasions when “the good that I will to do, I do not do; but the evil I will…

By the Rivers of Babylon

       Psalm 137 was written shortly after the nation of Judah had “become victims of plunder” to all its enemies (2 Kings 21:14).  The Babylonians had been used as Jehovah’s battle axe and weapon of war; they had broken the nation of Judah into…

The Exceedingly Sinfulness of Sin

       One of the important purposes of the Law of Moses is to expose the exceedingly sinfulness of sin (Romans 7:13).  True spiritual wisdom is attained when you have a firm and growing grasp of the enormity of sin.  In the words of Psalm…

The Way of the Transgressor

       David is a Bible character of extreme contrasts.  On the one hand, he was a man after God’s own heart (1 Samuel 13:14); he enjoyed extraordinary, blissful, and sweet fellowship with Jehovah.  On the other hand, he was also a man who experienced…

David’s Counsel on Sin

       Few Bible characters have more extensive inspired documentation of the devastating consequences of personal sin than David has.  Just as God’s prophet had promised (2 Samuel 12:10-11), the final chapters of David’s life (2 Samuel 13-24) bear solemn witness to the fact that…

Contemplating Sin–Part 2

       The superscription to Psalm 32 states that this sacred composition was written by David and was intended to be thoughtfully absorbed by contemplation.  In the Hebrew language it is identified as a “Maschil”.  The New King James Version translates this noun as “contemplation”. …

Contemplating Sin–Part 1

       The superscription to Psalm 32 states that this sacred composition was written by David and was intended to be thoughtfully absorbed by contemplation.  In the Hebrew language it is identified as a “Maschil”.  The New King James Version translates this noun as “contemplation”. …